When creating an offer, a landing page, subscription/sign up form, ask only for necessary information. People really don’t want to be bothered to fill in infinite spaces; in most cases, an email address and a name are more than enough. Ask for more info, and people won’t take time to fill it out, let alone leave their email. To successfully collect email addresses,  keep it short and straightforward.
In case you missed it, I’m a HUGE proponent of email lists! I’ve got tons of list building tips in podcast interviews and some great posts here all about building an email list and writing a newsletter. If you aren’t sure why you need to be list building and need tips for growing your newsletter subscribers, then check out the following posts, interviews, and resources!
I began working on sales funnels and knew the best way to get those working for me was to increase my list numbers. I’d been following everything Jennifer did through her Blog What You Love Facebook group. After watching her success in her own blog and talking with others who’d purchased List Love, I decided to take the plunge and get it, too, despite not being successful with my previous attempt.  
People like more choices, so consider creating subscription levels that let people sign up to receive content that’s relevant to them. For example, if you sell widgets and tax advice, provide three options on your opt-in form that allow users to sign up to receive info about widgets, info about tax advice or both. Further customize by allowing them to designate how frequently they’d like to hear from you — weekly, monthly or only when something really special is going on. People may be more likely to sign up for your email list if they have some control over the content they’ll receive.
The key to a great email list building is to know your audience and what it is they would need from you. It’s what helps you tailor the right content/offer/product/service that matters the most, that will convert in you receiving their emails. People don’t want to be disturbed, let alone with offers they don’t want or need, so do your research and prepare tailored proposal they would gladly like to receive.
If you know your target audience, you can set up the prize in a manner will be most appealing only for that segment. For example, if your business sells eco-friendly sneakers, the obvious option would be to give away a pair of the latest sneakers from your line of products. A cheaper and still relevant prize could be recycled coffee mugs, handcrafted jewelry, or organic cotton activewear.
Solutions are tailored to meet your budget and success goals as much as possible, and websites have been delivered costing just a few hundreds dollars a month or for one of payments of a few thousand... it all comes down to our discussions, if you want a website that generates millions of dollars in sales your budget will obviously be bigger, if you're a small business then your goals and costs will be more realistic, at least to start with.
Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
But your money could also be spent on advertising your product to a community – not a random set of people For example, John Lee Dumas runs a podcast called Entrepreneur on Fire. If you have a great product that will make an entrepreneur’s life easy, you can hit him up there. His episodes cover all things entrepreneurial and he boasts a loyal audience. His September listens totaled more than 1 million. John even recently published a useful blog post about podcast sponsorships.
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