Cathy is the Woodpecker blog’s creator & chief contributor. She used to spend lots of time contacting prospects, especially via email. One of the few people on Earth who read crappy cold emails from start to end and analyze them – for purely educational purposes. Taking care of this blog, reporting Woodpecker’s journey on the pursuit of happy openings, successful closures and all the new skills we acquire in between.
An active comments section is a great way to find out which blog post topic piqued your reader’s interest. If you’re lucky, readers may even be so kind as to ask you questions in their comment that you can answer as part of your email autoresponder course, or that you can use as an opportunity later to refer them to your email autoresponder course. I’ve had blog readers email me directly and ask if I could write specific posts to answer specific questions they had. As you can imagine, I’m more than happy to do so.

"Jennifer's course was exactly what I needed to start growing my email list. When I started her course, I had fewer than 30 random subscribers. Now my list is at 3,500 and it's growing every day. What's even better is that Jennifer teaches you how to build a targeted list with different opt-in forms so you know how people came to your blog and what they're interested in.  
The key to a great email list building is to know your audience and what it is they would need from you. It’s what helps you tailor the right content/offer/product/service that matters the most, that will convert in you receiving their emails. People don’t want to be disturbed, let alone with offers they don’t want or need, so do your research and prepare tailored proposal they would gladly like to receive.
Ever since I first time heard that you can get free traffic from a thing called Google, I wanted that. But, I had no idea where to start. And what was even worse, every “great” tip I’d receive from an “experts” was a complete BS that only sounds nice, but could never be used by real businesses. Most of those things are considered black-hat now. That’s how “great” those tips were.
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