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When I'm not designing websites, doing this online marketing stuff or writing. I love nothing more than getting out on a weekend and scuba diving. I'm a qualified rescue diver and love getting wet in the waters around Perth and Rottenest Island. I also cycle, which must be a sight as I'm not the thinnest of people (lol)... and a paddle on a kayak or a swim helps makes most weeks, perfect. At home I have a marine reef tank, which I just love and on top of that I've an awesome dog, called Ziggy.

Your current customer base is a great place to start building your email list. If you have a CRM system, you probably have already have clients’ email addresses. The more information you have, the better. Start with an overarching list that includes all customers and then keep segmenting and branching out based on who your customers are, where they are located, what they purchased, or any other number of relevant variables that you have collected. If you don’t have a CRM and have not been collecting emails of past clients, then you’ll have little tougher time. Try calling your past and current customers, look on their website for contact information or reach out on social media to acquire their emails. Starting with your current and past customers will give you a solid foundation to build on.  
Providing alternatives like these is an effective way to grow a nice big list of subscribers that are targeted to you and what you have to offer them. They are more likely to also be responsive to your website content through the comments section.  This captive audience is worth gold to you, so treat it well. When you market to them, they are more than likely to receive it well. 
I cracked the code on turning visitors into subscribers to build a mailing list from 0-10,000 subscribers in under 6 months on a new blog. This allowed me to earn a full-time income only nine months after I started my mailing list. I attribute over $24,000 of the income I earned in 2017 (my first full year of blogging) to my powerful mailing list. 

Cathy is the Woodpecker blog’s creator & chief contributor. She used to spend lots of time contacting prospects, especially via email. One of the few people on Earth who read crappy cold emails from start to end and analyze them – for purely educational purposes. Taking care of this blog, reporting Woodpecker’s journey on the pursuit of happy openings, successful closures and all the new skills we acquire in between.


Shorter email course. We have several short email autoresponders, and we use their brevity as part of the selling point. A short email course is the perfect answer to a reader who doesn’t want to be bothered too much, and who doesn’t want to commit to a long session of emails. A short email course works great for a tightly planned topic with a logical course outline, and a distinct beginning and end. With a shorter email course, people are more readily aware of previous content, and continuity and structure are important. A shorter course is also easier for a new blogger to get started with.
Building your email list can be overwhelming and tricky; that’s why you need help from relevant and reliable tools. Sure, you can try to grow your list manually, but it takes time and intense effort. And it is something we’ve all done in the beginning. Maybe. Nowadays, if you want to do it quicker and more efficient, you’ll use some of the ideas tools we talk about in this article. Furthermore, you’ll pair them with some of the tactics we offer at the end of the post. So, let’s dive in.
A useful footer. Below your main content is the footer of your email. It should contain a clear and simple way for your reader to unsubscribe, as required by the CAN-SPAM Act. Mention why they are getting the email (they signed up), and how to contact you. Email apps often take care of this for you, but just be sure it is included. The footer area is where you could do “self-advertising” if you wanted to. Keep it simple, if you choose to do it, preferably just one or two “ads” or links.
An email list can be one of the most valuable marketing assets a firm has. While building an audience on social platforms like Facebook or Twitter can be useful, investing time and resources into an asset that you don’t control can be dangerous. These platforms have the prerogative to ban your account and limit how and what you can say. Thus, email lists give you a direct path to your qualified audience. You’re free to say what you want to who you want, as much as you want: a luxury that you won’t find on social media, or through SEO and PPC.
Also, don’t be afraid of “scaring” people off by constantly asking for their email. Popovers are a great way to grow your email list, but many small businesses are afraid to implement them because of their bias perception. SumoMe analyzed 390 million pop-ups over a 1-month span and concluded that popovers, on average, convert emails at a rate of roughly 1.06%. While this might not seem like a high number, it’s still 1 out of 100 visitors and is one more lead for your sales funnel. You can increase your chances of converting with popovers by avoiding boring calls-to-action like “Sign up for our newsletter.”
I am happy to also ask for a plug for my family’s apparel website in the opener of said post if you think this post suggestion is a good idea. Shameless I know…..LOL! But hey maybe it will get your fans to keep submitting ideas. There might be something here to channel your fan base to get us to help your business. Think it over…..You really have reached Malcolm Gladwell Tribe status. And have done a great job with that. At this point whatever you asked the tribe to do they would deliver for you.
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