Email marketing can make or break a small business. Emails provide an invaluable resource for nurturing leads and moving customers through the sales funnel. Emails also give businesses a way to maintain relationships with existing clients. With email databases decaying by 22.5% every year, it’s important to have a strategy for generating new contacts.
Longer email course. We have noticed in our own email autoresponder courses that people do unsubscribe more as the course continues, but that does not mean you should not have an autoresponder that runs a longer time. It will take some readers longer to commit to you, your content, and ultimately, anything you are selling. A longer email autoresponder fits their needs perfectly. A longer email course is a good place to feature a set number of blog posts on a topic that you have written many blog posts on.
This is especially effective of course if the content you’re sharing is relevant to your own business, and if you’re sharing it to or with a group of your target audience. If you share highly relevant content on Facebook and your target audience clicks on it from your Snip.ly link, chances are they’ll also be interested in your content and opt-in offers. Use Snip.ly to add calls to action to all of the relevant content you share.
“At Oxyleads, we all come to work every day because we want to solve one of the biggest problem in lead generation – the lack of up-to-date business contacts. We understand that lead generation can be a bottleneck for the business. The ability to generate sufficient quality leads in a reasonable amount of time is crucial to business success. That’s why we believe that selecting the best technology (with an added human touch) will make sure that no business will ever need another source for lead generation.”
If you decided that you want to buy 2,512,596 visitors, it would cost you $125,629.80 if you paid 5 cents a visitor. If you bought 41,142 links from a service like Sponsored Reviews at a rate of $20 a link, you would have spent $822,840. And that wouldn’t even give you high quality links. We naturally got our links from sites like Huffington Post and Forbes.”
Jennifer has nailed my style of learning. I need actionable steps and I need them in order. Without knowing what I need to conquer first, I get lost and overwhelmed. Not only has she mastered the step-by-step approach to teaching but she also offers a personal approach. I love knowing that I can ask any question, at any time, and get an answer. She is obviously committed to the success of her students; it shows with everything she does!"
Thanks for weighing in Debbie. Completely agree, popups do annoy some people, and I can appreciate why. Like banner blindness, popup blindness is becoming more of a “thing” now too. But, they do work. And, I’ve found the more aggressive you are with them, the higher the conversion rate. Thrive Leads is the tool I use to build my email list https://www.robbierichards.com/recommended-tools/. Well worth a mention!
Customer reviews are the "social proof" that encourages people to join in on something. It's one thing for you to tell people to sign up for a campaign, but it's another thing for your happiest customers to say it too. Publish your best reviews from communities like Yelp right to your website. This adds genuine value to your landing pages when people are on the fence about submitting their contact information. 
Get creative. Since every business is different, some of the strategies in this guide might not work for your business if you implement them exactly as described. However, most of what’s described can work for a large majority of businesses with just a few tweaks. In some cases, you might even get greater results than the people who wrote these posts.
Internet audience is fast moving, and they tend to go from one to another in a fraction of a second. So every aspect of your user interface counts when you are trying to get their attention. Having a beautifully designed web page will not always lead to the fact that you’ll be having lots of visitors to your website who would come back again and again.
A useful footer. Below your main content is the footer of your email. It should contain a clear and simple way for your reader to unsubscribe, as required by the CAN-SPAM Act. Mention why they are getting the email (they signed up), and how to contact you. Email apps often take care of this for you, but just be sure it is included. The footer area is where you could do “self-advertising” if you wanted to. Keep it simple, if you choose to do it, preferably just one or two “ads” or links.
The content that goes to your email list should be a step above any other content you’re giving. The reason is that these are people who have expressed interest in you and your offerings already, or who have bought from you. Therefore, the content should be more targeted based on how they got on the list, and more valuable since you know who you’re creating it for and why.
Your blog or website is your canvas to play on in the first place. Think of all the places you can put and include a lead magnet CTA that is meaningful and noninvasive. From email subscriptions to various opt-ins, free offers somewhere in the posts, to Tell-A-Friend CTA, exit pop-ups and live chat plugins. Each of these tactics has only one goal – to collect emails, so unleash your creativity and think of the ways to use them throughout your site.

So many people talk about quick growth and numbers that it can be really discouraging AND have you chasing crazy numbers. Because email subscribers tend to be more high quality, that also means the list building tends to be slower over time. So first of all–ignore all the big talk about quick growth and high numbers. If you are trying to grow true, raving fans in your list, then your growth may have spikes, but should continue over time. Don’t ever stop thinking about email! Continue to consider what you can offer, where on your blog you can optimize for signups, and change things every few months.
Rework old copy and make it new. You may have a great post that you wish you could use, but the content is outdated and in much need of repair. There are several blog posts I’ve written that I’ve reworked and slapped a new headline on. The foundation and frame was good; they just needed a bit of remodeling. It is not unusual for us to use a looming new email autoresponder course as the impetus to get us to write several new blog posts for our blog. The topic or idea might be relevant, but the available blog posts at our disposal need rework.
Dig deep into your Google Analytics as well as Search Console to find out which content performs the best. Then, think about how you can upgrade that content with an attractive offer that will get you more emails. It should be something that directly answers the search intent and offers a solution or a clue to whatever it is people searched for. An excellent conversion tactic, for sure.
Contests and freebies are great tools to gather emails from your audience. Who doesn’t like something for free, right? Think of giveaways, sweepstakes, anything you can give to your audience in exchange for their email address. Just like in a landing page example below, it can be anything from ebooks, whitepapers, to actual products or services you can give for free. Combined with Social Media, it’s one of the fastest and easiest ways to grow your email list.
Never-ending. Some bloggers have a never-ending email autoresponder, always adding (and sometimes removing) blog posts from the queue based on what they’ve written lately. They build and prune their autoresponder “live”, while it is going out to readers. A never-ending autoresponder is a good place to feature your “greatest hits” and best blog posts on the broad topic of your niche blog. It is a recirculation tool, making sure your older, archived posts always get traffic.
That said, building a list from scratch can seem a little overwhelming at first. After all, newbies are in a bit of a catch-22 situation: They can’t start a campaign without addresses, but they’re often so dependent on email that they don’t know how to ask customers to opt in without emailing them. So how do you build an email list without email addresses? Once you have addresses, what do you do with them? How often should your send emails? What can you do to ensure your emails are delivered and not lost in spam or junk filters?

Get creative. Since every business is different, some of the strategies in this guide might not work for your business if you implement them exactly as described. However, most of what’s described can work for a large majority of businesses with just a few tweaks. In some cases, you might even get greater results than the people who wrote these posts.


Some readers will unsubscribe from your email autoresponder, whether it is short or long in duration. It is inevitable. Watch for trends that might indicate a necessary change (e.g. high unsubscribes after a particular lesson), but understand that unsubscribes are a natural part of your list’s equilibrium. Even if people unsubscribe, they were exposed to your content before they did so. Load the beginning of the course with excellence and go from there.

Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
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