Don’t read everything at once. There is a lot of great information in here, but it’s easy to feel overwhelmed after reading through all of the content in one sitting. Instead, take incremental steps. For example, if you want to find out where or how to ask people for their emails on your site, read the content in chapter 2. Implement it, then come back later for the next steps.
Rework old copy and make it new. You may have a great post that you wish you could use, but the content is outdated and in much need of repair. There are several blog posts I’ve written that I’ve reworked and slapped a new headline on. The foundation and frame was good; they just needed a bit of remodeling. It is not unusual for us to use a looming new email autoresponder course as the impetus to get us to write several new blog posts for our blog. The topic or idea might be relevant, but the available blog posts at our disposal need rework.
Shorter copy is powerful. 200-300 words or less is a good rule of thumb if you aren’t using a full blog post, especially if you are sending more than one email a week. We have used this idea of using only part of a blog post in our own emails, making sure that the introductory copy was sufficient to let the reader know exactly what the post was about. Entice without tricking, in other words.
But your money could also be spent on advertising your product to a community – not a random set of people For example, John Lee Dumas runs a podcast called Entrepreneur on Fire. If you have a great product that will make an entrepreneur’s life easy, you can hit him up there. His episodes cover all things entrepreneurial and he boasts a loyal audience. His September listens totaled more than 1 million. John even recently published a useful blog post about podcast sponsorships.
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