Your blog provides a great way to build a personal relationship with customers and prospects — and to gather their email addresses. Consistently end blogs with a call to action that encourages readers to sign up for your email messages. Require blog visitors to provide an email list in order to leave comments, and set it up so that they have to actively opt out if they don’t want their email address included on your mailing list.

"Much of what I've learned about list building has been from Bryan. I followed his plan for launching a new product to my email list to a 'T' and as a result, we had 20 people pay $197 for a product I hadn't even created yet! After validating that product, we've added over 100 new members to our course and generated over $40k in revenue in 2 months by following what Bryan teaches."
Liz is a professional copywriter and editor who creates successful and popular blog posts, landing pages, and email automation campaigns for AWeber, one of the world’s leading email marketing and automation platforms. Over the past 5 years, she’s sent hundreds of emails to millions of subscribers. She’s constantly scouring the email data of the “best of the best,” and she knows what works and what doesn’t when it comes to growing your business with the help of email.
“Hand-curated prospect list and email outreach every month. We explore and build sold once-only prospect lists, focused on your customer profiles. Best for the motivated business, startup, consultant, or freelancer. Each month we provide you with a fresh hand-curated list. We also mail you the winning email copy and design tailor-made for each of your customer profile. We are here to make you succeed and offer continuous support and sales review.”
Great article! I have been struggling with an email list. I have it set up and my thank you email then just simply a once a week email with my latest posts that I don’t even have to do it does it for me. I really need to buckle down and focus on my subscribers. I also should do a test to see what is working and what is not. Switch it up a but. Thanks for the info!
This reaction is rare with an email autoresponder course. Even though they’ll be added to your general email list, they still expect to get emails from you and are more receptive to all of the email you send. They get used to seeing your emails come in through your email autoresponder course; your other emails arriving to their inbox are no big deal.
iii) List of questions in one email without the answers. Then, you can set up an Email Automation for those who click through your newsletter, to receive another email afterwards, with the answers to the challenges. (Because, on Moosend’s platform, email automation sequences only “cost” you one credit per subscriber, regardless of the emails in the sequence.)
I’ll never forget the fun we had at those NFL celebrations at Regent Street in London, a couple of years back. My sister and I took part in a couple of games, one of which required yelling some American Football words at the top of our voices, and our mum was certain we were going to nail this. Sure this sounds supportive, but our mum’s focus was on “yelling”. Joke’s on her, we failed miserably (…we only caught “quarterback” out of all the words).
After collecting the emails of current and past customers, the next easiest way for small businesses to build their email list is to integrate email conversion into offline operations. Most small businesses have offline operations, whether that includes direct traffic to a brick and mortar store, client cold calls, customer support or any number of process that take place outside the internet. An opportunistic marketer should use these interactions as a way to grow their email list.

Your tip about CTA’s really hit the spot. I’ve been noticing that some of our competitors are using wordy yet highly specific buttons like ‘Get My Free Consultation Now!’ or ‘See Other Works From ____’. I was skeptic at first, but reading your logic behind it, it makes sense. I’m looking forward to implementing this on my own sites. Thank you, Brian.
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